Latest News

Home » Latest News

Commemorating Women’s History Month

in Latest News by RCSWD Comments are off

Credit: International Solid Waste Association; https://www.iswa.org/women-of-waste/

"Dreams are lovely, but they are just dreams. Fleeting, ephemeral, pretty. But dreams do not come true just because you dream them. It's hard work that makes things happen. It's hard work that creates change." - Shonda Rhimes

At the RCSWD, we are grateful for the women that work hard every day to lead the organization and keep operations going smoothly. We have highlighted each of them below:

Dawn Remes

Office Manager

Dawn has worked in her position for over 24 years! She takes care of the day-to-day tracking and paperwork from the transfer station and office, and even weighs trucks dropping off and picking up recycling at the Material Recovery Facility. Dawn always has a bright smile and cheery tone to help everyone out.

Vanessa Cable

Transfer Station Attendant

Vanessa is the only woman working as a regular attendant at the Gleason Road Transfer Station. She helps customers dispose of items at the recycling center and hazardous waste depot. Since the fall of 2018, she also collects hazardous waste from residents at surrounding town transfer stations during our rural collection runs.

Jenna Robles

Waste Reduction Program Coordinator

Jenna started her position in December of 2019, and has taken up the reigns with determination. She oversees the transfer station program operations to ensure compliance with regulations and optimal waste diversion. In addition, she tracks and reports at least monthly for most other transfer stations in our district

Women in the Materials Management Industry

The Solid Waste Association of North America has posted several great articles highlighting women working in our industry. We encourage you to read them.

We can't thank Dawn, Vanessa and Jenna enough for their hard work in an industry that the number of women employees has remained steady for years. Some might say it's a "male-dominated" industry, but there is also recognition of the need for diverse perspectives in materials management. Many groups are confident that more women will gain positions of leadership and share in the benefits of the industry as time goes on.

Following are some groups working to promote the success of women in materials management:

 

We also recommend checking out this revolutionary study released on March 26 by FP Analytics: "Women as Levers of Change: How Women are Changing Male-Dominated Industries".

The report examines women's inclusion and impact across 14 legacy industries including the waste sector and could be interesting for your Women’s History Month activities.

Read findings and download the report at WomenAsLeversOfChange.com

Updates Regarding Covid-19

in Latest News by RCSWD Comments are off

4/1/20

Please see our “Public Service Announcement” about limiting transfer station visits to essential items:

We are not trying to make light of our situation, but we hope you can enjoy a smile and a laugh while hearing our message. Thank you to all the essential workers that are risking their lives to serve our communities every day!

3/30/20

Our hazardous waste rural collections are on hold until further notice. Please stay tuned to Front Porch Forum and our media for updates.

3/26/20

Effective immediately, the Regional Transfer Station at 14 Gleason Road will only accept the essential materials for disposal when absolutely necessary. This includes ONLY trash, recycling and food scraps.

Consistent with the Governor’s Executive Order 01-20, the following materials will not be accepted:

-Hazardous Waste (including, but not limited to: paint, batteries, mercury-containing bulbs/devices, motor oil and other auto fluids, pesticides, chemicals, etc.)

-Scrap Metal, Electronics, Freon-containing appliances, Tires, Books, Clothing & Shoes and other donations

-Other materials up to the attendant’s discretion

This is a temporary restriction lasting at least until April 15, per Executive Order 01-20. Regular operating hours are in effect.

Additional requirements for facility use:

DO NOT ENTER if you have COVID-19 symptoms or possible exposure

MAINTAIN SOCIAL DISTANCE– at least 6’ from other people

UNLOAD YOUR OWN WASTE– employees have been instructed to not handle waste

NO CONGREGATING– leave facility once unloaded

PROVIDE CHECKS OR EXACT CASH for payment

We appreciate your patience and understanding as we navigate concerns associated with COVID-19.

For immediate updates: Refresh this page, sign up for our email list and follow us on social media

03/16/20

Our office and the Gleason Road Transfer Station are still operating on a normal schedule. We will not be giving any tours of facilities until further notice. Please stay tuned for any updates by social media or email.

  • Regional Transfer Station, 14 Gleason Rd, Rutland
    • Mon – Sat, 7 AM – 3 PM
  • Administrative Office, 1 Smith Rd, Rutland
    • Mon – Fri, 7 AM – 4:30 PM

Here are helpful guidance resources from:

– Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

– Vermont Department of Health

– Solid Waste Association of North America

Our staff are following the recommendations therein. We will continue to use recommended Personal Protective Equipment for any potential routine hazards.

Retailers and Redemption centers: Please read the VT DEC press release on temporarily exempting “retailers or redemption centers who fail to redeem beverage containers subject to Vermont’s bottle bill law (10 VSA §1523).”

Assistance for Essential Workers

See a list of people considered essential.

CONNECT TO AVAILABLE CHILD CARE RESOURCES
If you are considered “essential” and need child care for children up to grade 8:
1. Go to this new webform created for essential workers: https://webportalapp.com/webform/essentialworkers
2. Complete the form including your contact information and someone will be in touch within 24 hours to discuss available child care resources.
3. You can also dial 2-1-1 and press “6” to connect to someone about the available resources.
4. If you need child care immediately, call 1-877-705-9008 to be directed to your local Child Care Support Agency.

This connection service for essential workers will be in effect while schools and general child care services are closed due to COVID-19.

What to do if you are sick

If you are experiencing symptoms of illness, please consider waiting to dispose of materials at the transfer station until you regain health. If it becomes necessary for you to visit us while you are sick, please practice the recommendations by the CDC/VT DOH, which include:

  • Call your doctor/care provider
  • Stay home and separate yourself from others
  • Wear a facemask
  • Wash hands often with soap and water

Thank you for helping to keep our staff and each other safe and healthy!

For more information:

The VT DOH suggests calling 2-1-1 with any questions about COVID-19, the disease caused by the 2019 novel Coronavirus.

Please call us with any further questions about our facilities: (802) 775-7209

Executive Board Meeting- March 30, 2020

in Latest News by RCSWD Comments are off

RCSWD E-Board Meeting
Mon, Mar 30, 2020 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (EDT)

Please join the meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.

Link to join meeting.

You can also dial in using your phone.
(For supported devices, tap a one-touch number below to join instantly.)

United States: +1 (312) 757-3121
– One-touch: tel:+13127573121,,524284941#

Access Code: 524-284-941

New to GoToMeeting? Get the app now and be ready when your first meeting starts: https://global.gotomeeting.com/install/524284941

Please call with any questions: (802) 775-7209×202

Mount Tabor’s Share in RCSWD

in Latest News by RCSWD Comments are off

We aren’t a publicly traded corporation, but we do strive to make a profit so we can improve our services to better support our members. With every investment and capital gain we make, your town’s “share” in our assets increases.

The chart below shows that Mount Tabor’s proportional share in our expenses and income results in a net gain over the past two years. This will allow us to invest in better equipment, such as an excavator and an online permitting system, and return money to our members as we did this year.

Mount Tabor's Net Income share in RCSWD for 2018 and 2019 after all Town Operations

How does the District operate?

As you can guess by our name, we are a union municipal district (similar to a school district) that provides administrative, planning and auxiliary services for our members. Just as a Supervisory Union ensures that each school is in compliance with state and local regulations, we do the same for our member-towns’ transfer stations, haulers and businesses. Beyond that, we provide resources and technical assistance to ensure that everyone has access to necessary solid waste management options.

Mount Tabor’s Success in the District

Mount Tabor is the town with the smallest population in our district, but we continue to maintain a relationship to serve the residents. We have also been communicating with town clerk and transfer station attendant through the COVID-19 crisis. Stay tuned for our digital compost workshop in the Spring!

Are you getting the full value out of being part of the Rutland County Solid Waste District? Let us know if there’s anything that we can assist with from waste disposal and diversion to attending meetings and presenting on options to save money and help the environment!

Call (802) 775-7209, follow us on social media, and visit our transfer station, 14 Gleason Road, or office, 1 Smith Rd in Rutland.

Mount Holly’s Share in RCSWD

in Latest News by RCSWD Comments are off

We aren’t a publicly traded corporation, but we do strive to make a profit so we can improve our services to better support our members. With every investment and capital gain we make, your town’s “share” in our assets increases.

The chart below shows that Mount Holly’s proportional share in our expenses and income results in a net gain over the past two years. This will allow us to invest in better equipment, such as an excavator and an online permitting system, and return money to our members as we did this year.

Mount Holly's net income share in RCSWD for 2018 and 2019 after all town operations

How does the District operate?

As you can guess by our name, we are a union municipal district (similar to a school district) that provides administrative, planning and auxiliary services for our members. Just as a Supervisory Union ensures that each school is in compliance with state and local regulations, we do the same for our member-towns’ transfer stations, haulers and businesses. Beyond that, we provide resources and technical assistance to ensure that everyone has access to necessary solid waste management options.

Mount Holly’s Success in the District

We help with the tracking and reporting of disposal data, certification/permitting of solid waste facilities and outreach to schools and residents. We have been communicating with town officials and transfer station staff through the COVID-19 crisis. Their signs have influenced what we post at the Regional Transfer Station. Stay tuned for our digital compost workshop in the Spring!

Are you getting the full value out of being part of the Rutland County Solid Waste District? Let us know if there’s anything that we can assist with from waste disposal and diversion to attending meetings and presenting on options to save money and help the environment!

Call (802) 775-7209, follow us on social media, and visit our transfer station, 14 Gleason Road, or office, 1 Smith Rd in Rutland.

Mendon’s Share in RCSWD

in Latest News by RCSWD Comments are off

We aren’t a publicly traded corporation, but we do strive to make a profit so we can improve our services to better support our members. With every investment and capital gain we make, your town’s “share” in our assets increases.

The chart below shows that Mendon’s proportional share in our expenses and income results in a net gain over the past two years. This will allow us to invest in better equipment, such as an excavator and an online permitting system, and return money to our members as we did this year.

How does the District operate?

As you can guess by our name, we are a union municipal district (similar to a school district) that provides administrative, planning and auxiliary services for our members. Just as a Supervisory Union ensures that each school is in compliance with state and local regulations, we do the same for our member-towns’ transfer stations, haulers and businesses. Beyond that, we provide resources and technical assistance to ensure that everyone has access to necessary solid waste management options.

Mendon’s Success in the District

Many Mendon residents use our Gleason Road Transfer Station since it is right nearby and there is no town transfer station. That’s why we offer a reduced price for permits and disposal costs to those from our district towns.

Additionally, we help with the tracking and reporting of disposal data, certification/permitting of solid waste facilities and outreach to schools and residents. Stay tuned for our compost workshop in the Spring!

Are you getting the full value out of being part of the Rutland County Solid Waste District? Let us know if there’s anything that we can assist with from waste disposal and diversion to attending meetings and presenting on options to save money and help the environment!

Call (802) 775-7209, follow us on social media, and visit our transfer station, 14 Gleason Road, or office, 1 Smith Rd in Rutland.

Killington’s Share in RCSWD

in Latest News by RCSWD Comments are off

We aren’t a publicly traded corporation, but we do strive to make a profit so we can improve our services to better support our members. With every investment and capital gain we make, your town’s “share” in our assets increases.

The chart below shows that Killington’s proportional share in our expenses and income results in a net gain over the past two years. This will allow us to invest in better equipment, such as an excavator and an online permitting system, and return money to our members as we did this year.

How does the District operate?

As you can guess by our name, we are a union municipal district (similar to a school district) that provides administrative, planning and auxiliary services for our members. Just as a Supervisory Union ensures that each school is in compliance with state and local regulations, we do the same for our member-towns’ transfer stations, haulers and businesses. Beyond that, we provide resources and technical assistance to ensure that everyone has access to necessary solid waste management options.

Killington’s Success in the District

During the implementation of composting in the Town of Killington, the concern of bear presence around compost piles or collection bins comes up frequently. Several restaurants have already started diverting food scraps from the trash, and we provided them with best practices to avoid bear encounters at food scrap bins. We also hosted a compost workshop for residents to help practice bear aware composting.

Additionally, we help with the tracking and reporting of disposal data, certification/permitting of solid waste facilities and outreach to schools and residents. Stay tuned for our compost workshop in the Spring!

Are you getting the full value out of being part of the Rutland County Solid Waste District? Let us know if there’s anything that we can assist with from waste disposal and diversion to attending meetings and presenting on options to save money and help the environment!

Call (802) 775-7209, follow us on social media, and visit our transfer station, 14 Gleason Road, or office, 1 Smith Rd in Rutland.

Ira’s Share in RCSWD

in Latest News by RCSWD Comments are off

We aren’t a publicly traded corporation, but we do strive to make a profit so we can improve our services to better support our members. With every investment and capital gain we make, your town’s “share” in our assets increases.

The chart below shows that Ira’s proportional share in our expenses and income results in a net gain over the past two years. This will allow us to invest in better equipment, such as an excavator and an online permitting system, and return money to our members as we did this year.

How does the District operate?

As you can guess by our name, we are a union municipal district (similar to a school district) that provides administrative, planning and auxiliary services for our members. Just as a Supervisory Union ensures that each school is in compliance with state and local regulations, we do the same for our member-towns’ transfer stations, haulers and businesses. Beyond that, we provide resources and technical assistance to ensure that everyone has access to necessary solid waste management options.

Ira’s Success in the District

We collect Hazardous Waste at least once every year from any Ira residents at the Town Hall. Check out our schedule to see when we are coming this year!

Additionally, we help with the tracking and reporting of disposal data, certification/permitting of solid waste facilities and outreach to schools and residents. Stay tuned for our compost workshop in the Spring!

Are you getting the full value out of being part of the Rutland County Solid Waste District? Let us know if there’s anything that we can assist with from waste disposal and diversion to attending meetings and presenting on options to save money and help the environment!

Call (802) 775-7209, follow us on social media, and visit our transfer station, 14 Gleason Road, or office, 1 Smith Rd in Rutland.

2019 Annual Report

in Latest News by RCSWD Comments are off

HIGHLIGHTS OF
2019

Three New Staff came aboard!

Read on below to learn more about each of them.

We can't say thank you enough to the three people that retired from their administrative positions at RCSWD in 2019. Congratulations and happy trails to Jim O'Gorman, Joyce Segale and Deane Wilson! They served as previous District Manager, Treasurer and Waste Reduction Program Coordinator for 16, 23 and 26 years respectively. RCSWD would not have made the same accomplishments without them.

Mark Shea, District Manager

Mark Shea graduated from Bridgewater State College in Bridgewater, MA with a Bachelor of Science degree (BS) in Political Science. He received a Master of Public Administration degree (MPA) from Clark University, in Worcester, MA.

Mark's work experience includes 21 years and retiring from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. With a strong desire to work on the local level, he continued work in local government management as a town administrator and town manager in several communities. Now as RCSWD District Manager, he is embracing the task of serving seventeen member towns in diverting solid waste and partnering with the communities in bringing superior programs, education, and services to the region in an efficient and cost-effective manner.

Mark has an open-door policy and looks forward to participating in local events. Mark enjoys listening to National Public Radio at any time.

Gregory Giles, Treasurer

Greg worked in public accounting for several years auditing financial institutions and municipalities, preparing tax returns, risk management, compliance, etc. In 2011, he began working in captive insurance management for Marsh & McLennan Companies. After 8 years with Marsh, he needed a change of pace to focus on a healthier work / life balance. With 3 young sons growing up faster than he could imagine, working more reasonable hours and closer to home are priorities. Working at an organization focused on sustainability and environmental stewardship is an added bonus in coming to RCSWD.

He hopes to continue the excellent track record of fiscal responsibility the District has demonstrated under the tenure of Joyce Segale. He also wants to delivering greater efficiencies in RCSWD's financial management to help us “work smarter, not harder.”

Greg likes to listen to heavy metal, and a wide variety of artists while relaxing. Depending on the mood, the artist of choice could be Pink Floyd, Faith No More, NWA, Tool or many others!

Jenna Robles, Waste Reduction Program Coordinator

Jenna previously worked at a County detention facility in Colorado as a Program Coordinator and represented the Sheriff’s Office in a Countywide sustainability initiative. She and her husband moved from Denver, CO to Rutland, VT in June and their baby boy was born in September. She started working at RCSWD in December. It’s been a big year for Jenna!

Jenna hopes to learn how to operate heavy equipment at the transfer station this year, such as the excavator and loader.

While relaxing, Jenna likes to listen to Americana music.

Program Success

The following is a brief summary of our 2019 Annual Report:

The success of our programs is not our own accomplishment. We are very grateful for all of you, our customers, that participate in ways that benefit the our environment, economy and community! Don't hesitate to let us know if you have ideas on how we can improve our services.

Art Maroun removes contaminants from recycling

-Recycling: the Material Recovery facility's (MRF) processed 35,000 tons of commercial and houshold recyclables in 2019.  At the Gleason Road Transfer station, our customers and attendants sorted 385.25 tons of household recycling to reduce work at the MRF and keep valuable recyclables separate. This may seem relatively small, but it allows us to accept recyclables for free due to reduced disposal costs.

-Hazardous Waste: our Hazardous Waste Depot and rural collection events safely processed and disposed of 1,185 gallons of oil, antifreeze and flammable liquids, 12,320 lbs of batteries, 62,690 linear feet of fluorescent bulbs, nearly 60 tons of paint, and countless aerosol cans. We ran 33 collection events in our district for our 17 member towns serving 700 people at their transfer stations.

Grinding brush

-Organics: our transfer station processed over 2,000 tons of leaves, brush, and logs. Leaves are used in compost made by Vermont Natural Ag Products. Most of the brush/logs are ground on site and then sent to the McNeil electric and heat generating plant in Burlington, VT. Our food scrap program collected over 5 tons which is composted at a certified facility in Shaftsbury, VT.

-Outreach: our main focus is to prepare our district members to divert food scraps from the trash by July 1, 2020, as required by VT state law. We sold subsidized compost bins and collectors to 93 people, and held two compost workshops. We also supported 7 schools directly with planning and implementing food scrap separation. RCSWD and SWAC partner each year to reach over 100 businesses with proper disposal information.

Looking ahead...

  • Vermont Regulations- The final stage of the Universal Recycling Law goes into effect on July 1, 2020: no one in Vermont is allowed to throw food scraps in the trash. At the same time, the Single Use Products Law will ban businesses from providing plastic bags, straws, stirrers and styrofoam at the point of sale. Stay tuned on our website and social media (link needed) for updates on progress and tips to help you out!
  • 50 Years Later...- There are several 50th Anniversaries to celebrate this year! Let's kick off the new year by trimming our waste-lines. Reach out if you have any ideas to celebrate with us.
    • Jan. 1, 1970- the National Environmental Policy Act was created: this federal law "established a national policy to protect the environment, created a Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ), and required that environmental impact statements be prepared for major federal actions having a significant effect on the environment."1
    • April 18, 1970- Vermont's Green Up Day began: now the first Saturday in May (May 2, 2020), citizens, businesses and government work together to clean up litter from Vermont's roadsides. Don't forget to donate to fund Green Up Day directly on your tax return form, or online at any time.
    • April 22, 1970- Earth Day began: this continues to be one of the largest displays of public engagement and action in history. Get involved now to contribute to a huge celebration and day of action. Help organize tree plantings, litter pickup, and other creative ideas in your community, then post the event so others can join.
    • December 2, 1970- the Environmental Protection Agency was born: As it turns out, we are in the midst of the year-long 50th anniversary celebration! The federal agency has all-encompassing influence, authority and responsibility for many programs that local and state materials management governments carry out daily.

1Source: 1988 Article on NEPA: Past, Present, and Future, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Seeking Young Filmmakers in Brandon Area

in Latest News by RCSWD Comments are off

Interested in proper disposal of materials? That could be a great topic of a film to enter into this contest, and we would happily advise you. Call us at (802) 775-7209 or email carld@rcswd.com!

The Brandon Environmental Film Competition is seeking young aspiring filmmakers who are interested in environmental storytelling. Check us out here: www.BrandonFilms.org. Here’s what we’re looking for:

PURPOSE OF COMPETITION
-To encourage environmental awareness in the Brandon area
-To foster Brandon area skills-building in storytelling and environmental filmmaking
-To support young aspiring filmmakers in the Brandon area
-To encourage environmental awareness in the Brandon area
-To foster Brandon area skills-building in storytelling and environmental filmmaking
-To support young aspiring filmmakers in the Brandon area

SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS
-Film submissions should be 2-5 minutes long (submissions must be published on a youtube or vimeo channel
and submitted via hyperlink only)
-Films can be produced using any kind of equipment (e.g. smart phones)
-Films should feature an environmental issue within the Brandon area (e.g. problem areas such as trash burning and car pollution, or solutions areas like recycling and renewable energy)
-Films should be created, written, produced and edited by students (recognizing that teachers and parents will be involved, but the process should be led by the student)
-Film entries should come from students enrolled in the following schools (homeschoolers with Brandon area addresses are also encouraged to submit films): Barstow Memorial School, Lothrop Elementary School, Neshobe Elementary School, Otter Creek Academy at Leicester, Sudbury and Whiting, Otter Valley Union High School

SUBMISSION PROCESS
-Brandon area students should submit their full name, school or homeschool affiliation, and their film’s website
link to the following address: entry@brandonfilms.org

JUDGING CRITERIA
Films will be judged on the following basis:
-Clear and coherent environmental message
-Compelling invitation that encourages the public to get engaged in the environmental effort
-Creative storytelling, visuals, and site visits
-Concise editing

AWARDS
$500 for the First Prize
$250 for the Second Prize
$100 for the Third Prize
$50 for Honorable Mentions (for each of the judged criterion)

KEY DATES FOR COMPETITION
-Submissions accepted until March 1, 2020
-Winners announced online on May 1, 2020

SCREENING OF FILMS
Finalists’ submissions will be screened for the public in Brandon in May of 2020.

MORE INFORMATION
A few articles on why we’re hosting the Brandon Environmental Film Competition:
https://thereportervt.wordpress.com/2019/09/26/film-contest-encourages-environmental-awareness/
https://www.rutlandherald.com/news/brandon-resident-hosts-student-video-competition/article_3d18abb5-7528-55de-a44c-b0488cfa2d20.html

Page 1 of 612345...Last »